Novak Djokovic is on course to become the greatest men’s tennis player of all time after winning Wimbledon, a proclamation made by Goran Ivanisevic after the Australian Open earlier this year which has been proven right.

The Serbian has dominated this year winning in Melbourne, Roland Garros and Wimbledon.

He could win a calendar Grand Slam with victory at the US Open later this year as well as adding a gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics in the next few weeks.

Djokovic’s coach and former Wimbledon champion in his own right, Ivanisevic, believes Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer could still win Grand Slams but they won’t end up with the most.

He made the claims after the Australian Open earlier this year which now look remarkably accurate.

He said: “This is great. Number 18 is secured, and now the chase is on. It should be great, as Novak has a lot of confidence.

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Djokovic is still head and shoulders above everyone else on the tour although there are encouraging signs that the next generation may be coming through.

The Serbian beat Matteo Berrettini in the Wimbledon final while the likes of Alexander Zverev, Dominic Thiem and Denis Shapovalov have all shown potential.

Djokovic is the overwhelming favourite for the Olympic gold medal with six of the top 12 players in the world absent.

Federer withdrew shortly after Wimbledon, releasing a statement on his reasons.

He explained: “During the grass-court season, I unfortunately experienced a setback with my knee, and have accepted that I must withdraw from the Tokyo Olympic Games.

“I am greatly disappointed, as it has been an honour and highlight of my career each time I have represented Switzerland.

“I have already begun rehabilitation in the hopes of returning to the tour later this summer.

“I wish the entire Swiss team the best of luck and I will be rooting hard from a far. As always Hopp Schwiz!”





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