Politics

Liz Cheney aims to be a leader for anti-Trump Republicans after primary loss – live


Many Republicans have stood against Donald Trump. Few have succeeded.

Liz Cheney will now be the latest to try, looking to capitalize on her conservative voting record, her vice-chairmanship of the January 6 committee and of course her father’s time as vice-president under Republican George W. Bush.

Trump remains the favorite among Republicans for the party’s 2024 presidential nomination, and undoing that would require Cheney to convince the GOP to abandon the viewpoints and policies he brought into the mainstream when he won the White House in 2016. It’s a tough ask, and no shortage of Republicans have failed in the past. Just ask the eight House Republicans who voted for Trump’s impeachment but then were ousted by voters or opted to retire, or the various party fathers and moderates who begged the GOP not to back Trump, only to be bowled over by the will of the electorate.

Why is Cheney doing it? As she said in her concession speech last night, “A few years ago, I won this primary with 73 percent of the vote. I could easily have done the same again. The path was clear, but it would have required that I go along with President Trump’s lie about the 2020 election… That was a path I could not and would not take.”

Politico’s Playbook has another theory. Cheney won’t have much competition in the Trump-hating space, they write, with the GOP more or less in his grips and Democrats split over how big of a deal to make of him among their voters. “So rather than a kamikaze mission, her primary loss may have been more like parachuting out of a plane that had outlived its usefulness. Her great task now is figuring out where to land,” Playbook says.

Key events

Liz Cheney was praised on MSNBC this morning by, of all people, White House chief of staff Ron Klain.

“I don’t think there was anything we agree on,” said Klain, who was tasked by Joe Biden with getting his legislative proposals through Congress. “But, I respect enormously her commitment to democracy.”

.@WHCOS Ron Klain commends Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) for upholding her oath to the Constitution, instead of swearing “fealty” to Donald Trump:

“I respect enormously [Liz Cheney’s] commitment to democracy … instead of her commitment to one man.” pic.twitter.com/wIKog8CyQQ

— The Recount (@therecount) August 17, 2022

Pence ‘would consider’ talking to January 6 committee – but with caveats

A closer look at former vice-president Mike Pence’s remarks about testifying before the January 6 committee indicates Donald Trump’s one-time White House deputy would indeed entertain the request, but also has concerns about the constitutional implications.

Here’s a full video of his comments:

Former Vice President Mike Pence when asked if he would cooperate if the January 6th committee called on him to testify:

“If there was an invitation to participate, I would consider it.” pic.twitter.com/y9NFrHwYtf

— The Recount (@therecount) August 17, 2022

The Inflation Reduction Act signed yesterday was another major part of the Biden administration’s climate plan, and includes a slew of new tax incentives to encourage green investments, Oliver Milman reports:

The giant climate bill signed by Joe Biden on Tuesday is set to touch upon myriad aspects of Americans’ lives, helping shape everything from the cars they drive to the stovetops in their kitchens.

Biden has lauded the $369bn of climate spending in the Inflation Reduction Act as the “largest investment ever in combatting the existential crisis of climate change” and predicted it will save people hundreds of dollars each year in energy costs. This claim is based upon a series of investments aimed at shifting buying habits away from a polluting status quo towards cleaner, electrified vehicles and appliances.

A US household could save $1,800 on their energy costs each year, according to a recent estimate, although this would require the installation of electric heat pumps for hot water and air conditioning, replacing a gasoline-powered car with an electric vehicle and installing solar panels on the roof.

Court allows Biden administration to again pause oil and gas leases on federal land

A Louisiana judge has allowed the Biden administration to reinstate a pause on new oil and gas leases on federal land, in a win for the White House’s climate policy, Reuters reports.

The order by a judge in the fifth circuit court of appeals overturns a previous lower court ruling that blocked the pause, which Joe Biden announced in the opening days of his administration. Earlier this year, the interior department began selling new onshore oil and natural gas drilling leases while the case made its way through court.

Mild tidbit of news from Mike Pence during his appearance in New Hampshire, as reported by Politico:

Former VP Mike Pence says if there was an invitation to testify before the Jan. 6 committee, “I would consider it.” #nhpolitics

— Lisa Kashinsky (@lisakashinsky) August 17, 2022

Pence isn’t known to have talked to the committee. However, his name has been all over the public hearings, which have featured in-person and videotaped testimony from people close to Trump’s vice-president about what he was doing in the days before the attack on the Capitol, and during the assault, when he had to flee to a hidden area. Meanwhile, Pence’s former chief of staff has spoken to a grand jury investigating the assault.

Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani has arrived at an Atlanta court for his appearance before a special grand jury investigating the effort to overturn the state’s 2020 election results.

He was greeted by something of a media circus:

Rudy Giuliani has arrived at the Fulton County Courthouse to testify in grand jury proceedings looking into interference in the 2020 election results. @cbs46 pic.twitter.com/6mAC7AdcNQ

— Madeline Montgomery (@MadelineTV) August 17, 2022

Rudy Giuliani arrives at the Fulton County Courthouse, with a mob of cameras and reporters following his entrance, as he is set to testify behind closed doors in a special grand jury probe.

He is a target of the investigation. #gapol pic.twitter.com/64BWdHcKVT

— stephen fowler (@stphnfwlr) August 17, 2022

Giuliani’s appearance will not be public, but Fulton county district attorney Fani Willis, who convened the special grand jury, has informed the one-time New York City mayor he is a target of the investigation. Giuliani made repeated efforts to convince state officials that Georgia’s 2020 election results were fraudulent, but none of the allegations were ever found to have substance.

Many Republicans have stood against Donald Trump. Few have succeeded.

Liz Cheney will now be the latest to try, looking to capitalize on her conservative voting record, her vice-chairmanship of the January 6 committee and of course her father’s time as vice-president under Republican George W. Bush.

Trump remains the favorite among Republicans for the party’s 2024 presidential nomination, and undoing that would require Cheney to convince the GOP to abandon the viewpoints and policies he brought into the mainstream when he won the White House in 2016. It’s a tough ask, and no shortage of Republicans have failed in the past. Just ask the eight House Republicans who voted for Trump’s impeachment but then were ousted by voters or opted to retire, or the various party fathers and moderates who begged the GOP not to back Trump, only to be bowled over by the will of the electorate.

Why is Cheney doing it? As she said in her concession speech last night, “A few years ago, I won this primary with 73 percent of the vote. I could easily have done the same again. The path was clear, but it would have required that I go along with President Trump’s lie about the 2020 election… That was a path I could not and would not take.”

Politico’s Playbook has another theory. Cheney won’t have much competition in the Trump-hating space, they write, with the GOP more or less in his grips and Democrats split over how big of a deal to make of him among their voters. “So rather than a kamikaze mission, her primary loss may have been more like parachuting out of a plane that had outlived its usefulness. Her great task now is figuring out where to land,” Playbook says.

After primary loss, Liz Cheney aims for new job: Trump foe-in-chief

Good morning, US politics blog readers. Last night, Republican voters rejected Liz Cheney’s bid to continue serving as their congresswoman, meaning she has only the remainder of the year left in the House of Representatives. She will continue in the highly public role of vice-chair of the January 6 committee, but this morning, Cheney said she is thinking about a run for presidency in 2024 – putting her in a position to compete directly against Donald Trump, a fellow Republican whom she loathes.

We’re certain to hear more about that today, but here’s what else is happening:

  • In Alaska, ex-governor Sarah Palin advanced in the special election to fill the state’s open house seat, giving the one-time vice-presidential nominee a shot at returning to national politics. Voters will make their final decision in November.

  • Former vice-president Mike Pence – who also fell out with Trump – is in New Hampshire, another state where voters are known as early kingmakers for aspiring presidential candidates. Indeed, Pence has hinted he may run in 2024.

  • The Biden administration will attempt a victory lap following the signing of the Inflation Reduction Act yesterday, the Democrats’ landmark spending plan to fight climate change and lower health care costs. However Joe Biden himself is on vacation in Delaware.





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