Fine art and high fashion collided on the catwalk in Paris this morning as master craftsman Jonathan Anderson unveiled his latest collection for Loewe.

Incorporating the work of Japanese ceramicist Takuro Kuwata, the Northern Irish Dalston-based designer turned his creations into wearable works of art with the addition of panelling moulded from porcelain.

These delicate disks appeared studded with gold dots, placed in the centre of the torso and framed in folded of fabric which were wrapped around the body to form a dress.


The same concept was also used to decorate the house’s iconic Flamenco bag with bulbous baubles adorning drawstrings like jewellery.

(Imaxtree)

This painstaking attention to detail is something which has come to define not just this collection – or that of his eponymous JW Anderson label, which he showed during London Fashion Week just last week – but his entire legacy as a designer.

Clearly keen to push the boundaries he has long since exploded since his appointment at the Spanish luxury leather goods house in 2013, Anderson explained backstage that this season was “all about the pleasure of playing with fashion. It’s dressing to impress.”

Accordingly, exaggerated silhouettes formed a key part of his vision. One pair of wide leg trousers were cut square and oversized at the hip, so the waistband extended out at the sides in spectacular fashion.

(Imaxtree)

Elongated fluted sleeves, tiered and trimmed in tiny crystals, also decorated ribbed wool gowns, alongside bustle skirts, wide cape coats and billowing trousers wrapped tight at the ankles so the cuffs fanned out over shoes.

As far as having fun with fashion is concerned, what could be better than a flock of ostentatiously fabulous feathered headdresses? Certainly these are what commanded the most attention from the front row’s iPhones cameras and Instagram feeds. As for their wardrobes, a pair of crystal flower Mary Janes may prove more practical.



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