TV and Movies

‘Better Call Saul’: Kim Returns, So Does [SPOILER], and Saul Gets Violent


SPOILER ALERTDo not read if you have not watched the 12th episode of “Better Call Saul” Season 6, titled “Waterworks.”

Kim Wexler is back!

After she and Saul (Bob Odenkirk) had a shocking break-up three episodes ago, “Better Call Saul” fans have been going through a Wexler withdrawal. Luckily, all that changed on Monday night’s penultimate episode, and we got a lot of answers about where Kim (Rhea Seehorn) has been in the “Breaking Bad” and post-“Breaking Bad” worlds.

The episode opens during the “Breaking Bad” timeline, where Saul is bouncing a stress ball against his office wall. Francesca (Tina Parker) informs him that everyone in the waiting room can hear him through the wall, and he has a special visitor: Kim. Though we don’t see Kim at this point, Saul says to let “her” in and they prepare to sign their official divorce papers.

Before we see Kim for the first time during the main “Breaking Bad” era, we flash-forward to where she is after “Breaking Bad,” and that is far from the dry deserts of Albuquerque in boring, mundane Florida. Her life has changed majorly after she left Saul; she’s dating a new man, rocking a new haircut, trying out a new mayonnaise and watching “The Amazing Race.” She now works at Palm Coast Sprinklers in the Catalog & Brochures department, away from Saul’s morally-draining exploits. That is, until she gets a phone call from him, which we saw in last week’s episode without sound.

In tonight’s episode, we finally hear what was said between Saul and Kim, and, wow, things are messy! Saul, fully in the Saul Goodman persona of “Breaking Bad,” jokingly says he’s calling to catch up after six years and brags that he’s still alive and getting away with everything. Kim restrains herself, simply saying he shouldn’t be calling her and that he should turn himself in. Saul doesn’t take her words well and says the pot is calling the kettle black.

“We’re both too smart to throw our lives away for no reason,” he tells her, while also revealing that Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito) and Mike Ehrmantraut (Jonathan Banks) are dead. Almost tearing up, Kim tells Saul she’s glad he’s alive, then hangs up the phone. After that, a coworker barges into Kim’s office and she’s forced to join in on the most awkward round of “Happy Birthday” in workplace history.

Still in the black-and-white timeline, we follow Kim from Florida back to good ‘ole Albuquerque. She revisits the courthouse and some key “Better Call Saul” locations, like Mike’s ticket booth and the outdoor table where she and Saul planned schemes. Then, she goes to Howard Hamlin’s (Patrick Fabian) house and sits down with his wife Cheryl (Sandrine Holt). Kim confesses everything, and I mean, everything.

She spills on her and Saul’s plot to ruin Howard’s reputation, the fake cocaine addiction, Lalo Salamanca’s (Tony Dalton) murder of Howard and his staged suicide. Kim gave her confessional to the courthouse, but admits there’s little physical evidence that would make any charges stick. On the way back to the airport, Kim breaks down and sobs violently, finally freeing herself of the guilt she’s harbored for years. Out of a season full of Emmy-worthy moments, this heart-wrenching scene sits near the top of the list.

The next time we see Kim this episode, it’s back in Saul’s office during “Breaking Bad.” Saul doesn’t care she’s moving to Florida and reveals she didn’t take her share of the massive Sandpiper payout. But the major moment comes as Kim leaves Saul’s office and lights up a cigarette…which draws the attention of none other than Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), who’s taking shelter from the rain and bums a cig.

It’s one of the strangest pairings of “Breaking Bad” and “Better Call Saul” characters, but one that works surprisingly well. Jesse recognizes Kim from one of his friend’s legal run-ins and commends her for getting his friend off scot-free. He then asks if Saul is “the real deal,” and Kim reluctantly, but truthfully, answers, “When I knew him, he was.”

Speaking of Saul, he spends much of the episode snooping around the house of the cancer patient he met last episode, looking for valuables. During his search, Saul’s victim wakes up from his drug-induced slumber, and it looks like Saul’s luck has run out. Just as Saul is ready to knock the man out with a vase of his dog’s ashes, he passes out once again.

However, Saul’s isn’t free yet. Outside, Jeffy (Pat Healy) realizes he’s parked his cab in front of two cops, but the officers are too distracted by their food to notice Jeffy — until he panics, hits the gas and crashes into a parked car down the street. Saul’s reluctant partner-in-crime lands himself in prison, but Saul promises over the phone that he’ll bail him out no problem.

But will Saul get the chance? When he returns to Marion’s (Carol Burnett) house to tell her about Jeffy’s arrest, he discovers the elderly woman has stumbled upon some of his old Saul Goodman commercials. Realizing that “Gene” isn’t who he says he is, Marion condemns him as a conman. Amid the black-and-white scene, there’s a pop of color in Saul’s glasses from the Saul Goodman commercials, making a crossover from the black-and-white and in-color timelines. Suddenly, perhaps channeling his inner Walter White, Saul drops the act and threateningly approaches Marion, holding her phone cord like he’s going to strangle her. Before anything can happen, Marion presses her Life Alert button and says she’s being attacked, and Saul Goodman is the perpetrator.

How will Saul get out of this one? Will he and Kim ever reconcile? “Better Call Saul” fans will have to wait just one week more until all is resolved in next week’s series finale.





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