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Abortion and gun decisions loom as US supreme court releases more opinions – live


You don’t necessarily need to win an election to wield power in Washington. Today, two institutions composed of political appointees will make decisions that could have massive impacts on Americans.

At 2 pm eastern time, the Federal Reserve, which is by law mandated to fight inflation, will almost certainly raise interest rates again. Less certain is the size of the increase. Many believe the Fed will up rates by 0.75 percent for the first time since 1994, though they could also opt for a more modest 0.5 percent increase. Such hikes work to dampen demand from consumers, which is a factor in the country’s decades-high inflation rate. But high rates can slow economic growth, and with the Fed committed to continue hiking until it feels inflation is under control, economists increasingly worry the country will enter a recession, perhaps next year.

But first comes the 10 am eastern time release of decisions from the supreme court. The justices have a number of cases before them, but there’s no telling which ones they’ll release. Tensions around the court are high following last month’s unprecedented leak of their draft opinion on abortion that would overturn the right nationwide. But the court’s conservative majority may also decide to expand the right to carry a concealed weapon, weaken the government’s power to regulate and block the Biden administration from ending the “remain in Mexico” policy put in place during former president Donald Trump’s term.

Of course, elections are a factor in how both of these institutions behave. The supreme court justices and the leaders of the Federal Reserve are both appointed by presidents, who only get into the White House if they have the votes.

The troubles facing House representative Barry Loudermilk don’t appear to have ended.

While the Capitol Police said yesterday there was “no evidence” the Georgia Republican gave Trump supporters a tour of the Capitol the day before the January 6 insurrection, Punchbowl News reports the committee investigating the attack has found new evidence that raises questions about the lawmaker’s actions.

Citing sources, Punchbowl said that the committee has footage of Loudermilk on January 6, 2021 outside the Capitol with a man who took part in the tour with the lawmaker the day before and went on to yell threats at lawmakers during the insurrection.

The committee is now debating what to do with the video, according to the report:

The individual in question has been interviewed by select committee investigators, the sources added. It doesn’t appear that he’s been charged with any wrongdoing stemming from the insurrection.

What to do with this evidence has been debated inside the select committee. It was discussed during an intense huddle on the House floor Tuesday involving Reps. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), Stephanie Murphy (D-Fla.), Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and Pete Aguilar (D-Calif.). Thompson is chair of the select committee.

The panel is considering releasing the footage publicly, using it in a hearing or sending a letter to Loudermilk laying out their evidence.

The select committee declined to comment on the matter Tuesday night.

Victoria Bekiempis

Victoria Bekiempis

A special election in south Texas last night ended with bad news for Democrats when the district chose a Republican to represent it in the House of Representatives for the first time. But as Victoria Bekiempis reports, the victor Mayra Flores will face a stiffer challenge in November, when she must stand for her seat once more.

A south Texas congressional district will be represented by a Republican for the first time following a special election Tuesday. The election of Mayra Flores, who bested her Democrat competitor in a 51%-43% vote, comes as Republicans continue to make inroads among Latino voters in south Texas.

Flores, reportedly the first Latina Republican to serve Texas in Congress, is expected to face a more challenging race in November, however. Her victory was to replace Democrat Filemon Vela, who retired before his term ended – meaning she was elected to serve out the remainder.

During November’s general election, voters will determine who will serve as the district’s permanent congressional representative starting in 2022. Flores, who is running for this seat in the general election, will face off against Democratic nominee Vicente Gonzalez.

You don’t necessarily need to win an election to wield power in Washington. Today, two institutions composed of political appointees will make decisions that could have massive impacts on Americans.

At 2 pm eastern time, the Federal Reserve, which is by law mandated to fight inflation, will almost certainly raise interest rates again. Less certain is the size of the increase. Many believe the Fed will up rates by 0.75 percent for the first time since 1994, though they could also opt for a more modest 0.5 percent increase. Such hikes work to dampen demand from consumers, which is a factor in the country’s decades-high inflation rate. But high rates can slow economic growth, and with the Fed committed to continue hiking until it feels inflation is under control, economists increasingly worry the country will enter a recession, perhaps next year.

But first comes the 10 am eastern time release of decisions from the supreme court. The justices have a number of cases before them, but there’s no telling which ones they’ll release. Tensions around the court are high following last month’s unprecedented leak of their draft opinion on abortion that would overturn the right nationwide. But the court’s conservative majority may also decide to expand the right to carry a concealed weapon, weaken the government’s power to regulate and block the Biden administration from ending the “remain in Mexico” policy put in place during former president Donald Trump’s term.

Of course, elections are a factor in how both of these institutions behave. The supreme court justices and the leaders of the Federal Reserve are both appointed by presidents, who only get into the White House if they have the votes.

Abortion, gun decisions loom as supreme court releases more opinions

Good morning, US politics blog readers. Today begins with the release of another batch of decisions from the supreme court, and while there’s no telling which of the many cases pending before them they’ll release opinions on, the court’s conservative majority is thought to be ready to restrict abortion rights, expand the ability to carry a concealed weapon and maybe curb the government’s power to regulate emissions.

Here’s what else is going on today:



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